Tucson Show Report 4 – TGMS

In our second report from the Tucson Gem and Mineral Society Show we bring you photos of the special displays and also specimens and new finds from around the show.

Friday morning is always children’s morning, with many groups of school children visiting the show. These are tomorrow’s collectors, and we encourage them to come into the booth and see the minerals. We bring along ‘grab’ bags for the children with a surprise mineralogical item in each, which are a great hit.

Audrey with the 'grab' bags ready for her first young customer

Audrey with the ‘grab’ bags ready for her first young customer

Roberta McCarty, Lois Nelson and Tana Daugharthy

Robbie, Lois and Tana

The Collector’s Edge always have an impressive booth, this year including two crystal chandeliers hanging from the convention centre roof. As well as their many new finds they had some superb Native Golds on display.

Native Gold from Eagle's Nest Mine, California,

Native Gold from Eagle’s Nest Mine, California, which originally passed through our hands – it is always interesting to see how a specimen circulates

Native Gold in Quartz from Western Australia, 176 Ounces Troy

Native Gold in Quartz from Western Australia, 176 Ounces Troy

Dona inspects two of the new Russian Rubellites and a huge Aquamarine from Tamal Nadu, India

Dona inspects two of the new Russian Rubellites and a huge Aquamarine from Tamal Nadu, India

Alain Martaud had several lovely Smoky Quartz specimens found at the end of Sept 2014 in the Tour Noir Glacier, Chamonix, France. The discovered pocket was quite big, around 2 metres and approximately 150 specimens were recovered. However only six specimens (all found in one corner) were of high quality with superb colour, lustre, gemminess and no damage. Alain had 5 of these on display. Here is one of the best, held by Alain for scale. Pretty impressive.

Large gemmy Smoky Quartz crystal from the Tour Noir Glacier, Chamonix, France

Large gemmy Smoky Quartz crystal from the Tour Noir Glacier, Chamonix, France

If only! Alain goofing around and adding a pink Fluorite onto the Quartz specimen

If only! Alain goofing around and adding a pink Fluorite onto the Quartz specimen

There were a several new finds around the show – more of the new Ce-rich blue Beryls from Pakistan that we reported on at Munich last year, Epidote in Quartz from Brazil, and these attractive Stellerite, Stilbite and Epidote from Diaboukara, Kayes, Mali, in the booth of Jean Claude Leydet. These were mined in the last two months, the most recent were found just two weeks ago.

New Stellerite, Stilbite and Epidote from Diaboukara, Kayes, Mali

New Stellerite, Stilbite and Epidote from Diaboukara, Kayes, Mali

There was a cabinet of new vibrant orange Wulfenite from the Rowley Mine, Arizona.

Wulfenite from Rowley Mine, Arizona by Bob McDowell

Wulfenite with orange balls of Mimetite from Rowley Mine, Arizona by Bob McDowell

This piece was found just over a month ago, and has not yet been prepared – pretty impressive how they come out of the ground!

Wulfenite with Mimetite from Rowley Mine, Arizona

Wulfenite with Mimetite from Rowley Mine, Arizona

Just outside our booth was this huge Gold Nugget, with some crystallisation, from Mt Monger, Western Australia. It was found in 2014, we believe by a metal detector which must have been quite the experience! It weighs 117 Troy ounces or 3.6 kg.

Native Gold 'Thunderbolt' a partly crystallised nugget from Mt Monger, Western Australia

Native Gold ‘Thunderbolt’, a partly crystallised nugget from Mt Monger, Western Australia

On our wanders we found Nicolai Medvedev with his special display. Nicolai creates the most beautiful inlaid objects, and had several boxes on display inlaid with Gold in Quartz, Malachite, Rhodochrosite and more. On the back of his case was several polished slices of pink Rhodochrosite and what is one of the best polished Malachite slices we have seen.

Dona with Nicolai Medvedev

Dona with Nicolai Medvedev

Inlaid box by Nicolai Medvedev

Inlaid box by Nicolai Medvedev

Gail Spann had a thought provocating display of pink minerals to celebrate her recovery from breast cancer and to honour women in the mineral business who have also survived. It is quite saddening there are so many names, even sadder to consider how many others did not survive, but it was lovely to see Gail looking so well at the show.

The pink case to support Breast Cancer awareness

The pink case to support Breast Cancer awareness and honour mineral collecting women who have survived this cancer

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Cobaltoan Calcite from Bou Azzer, Morocco on left and a curvy Rhodochrosite from Santa Eulalia, Mexico on right

A very large Rose Quartz polished to show the 'star'

A very large Rose Quartz polished to show the ‘star’

Dealer Marcus Budil had two display cases, the first with a very fine selection of specimens, with a large Beryl on the right with a blue Aquamarine centre and a pink Morganite rim.

Display by Marcus Budil

Display by Marcus Budil

A closeup of the very gemmy starburst Quartz specimen from McEarl Mine, Arkansas with a Rhodochrosite from Hotazel Mine, South Africa and an amazing Emerald from Colombia – the crystal was approx 5cm wide by 10cm long with the best colour and very lustrous termination.

Starburst Quartz from McEarl Mine, Arkansas with Rhodochrosite from Hotazel Mine, South Africa and Emerald from Colombia

Starburst Quartz from McEarl Mine, Arkansas with Rhodochrosite from Hotazel Mine, South Africa and Emerald from Colombia

A beautiful violet coloured Tanzanite crystal from Merelani, Tanzania

A beautiful violet coloured Tanzanite crystal from Merelani, Tanzania

Quartz has featured heavily at this show, both in the new finds and the special displays, fitting nicely with the Western Europe theme with many Alpine Quartzes. Marcus had a second cabinet with a selection of superb Quartz from Switzerland including Gwindels and gemmy prismatic Smoky Quartz.

Quartz specimens from Switzerland, plus a few Swiss Hematites

Quartz specimens from Switzerland, plus a few Swiss Hematites

Siber + Siber of Switzerland also featured a case of minerals from the Swiss Alps, with many superb Quartz specimens, plus pink Fluorites and Hematites.

Alpine display by Siber + Siber

Alpine display by Siber + Siber

Exceptional Smoky Quartz clusters on Granite matrix - gemmy, lustrous and great colour from Rufibach Pocket, Vordre, Zinggenstock, Grimsel, Switzerland

Exceptional Smoky Quartz clusters on Granite matrix – gemmy, lustrous and great colour from Rufibach Pocket, Vordre, Zinggenstock, Grimsel, Switzerland

Next to the Siber’s case was this excellent display of Quartz Gwindels, nicknamed Sucres (or Sugar in English) as they were thought to resemble French style sugar lumps in the 1960s by crystal hunters in Chamonix. The understanding of Gwindel growth is relatively new, and this case did an excellent job at explaining it with examples of young Gwindels (first growth of a tall and twisted seed) and old Gwindels (when the seed has been entombed by a subsequent larger growth forming a holotaxial envelope). The young crystals have straight edges, and the older ones the well recognised serrated edges.

Sucre or closed Gwindels showing the progression of young with straight edges on the right through to old with serrated edges on left

Sucre or closed Gwindels showing the progression of young with straight edges on the right through to old with serrated edges on left

A closeup showing (L to R) tall and old, short and old, long and young, short and young.

Closed Gwindels of young and old, short and long forms

Closed Gwindels of young and old, short and long forms

In one section of the special exhibits it was the Great Quartz Crystal Face-off, with many displays showing the wide variety of forms and colours of this common mineral. There is something very appealing about Quartz, and the variety makes it very popular with many collectors.

Quartz display

Quartz display

Closeup of the display showing a selection of Japan-law twins from different locations

Closeup of the display showing a selection of Japan-law twins from different locations

Another Quartz display

Another Quartz display

One very interesting case was this display of lab grown Quartz, using the hydrothermal method. This really gives you pause for thought to see the quality of the ‘specimen’ that can be grown – some of these you would not think twice about if you saw it for sale. There were even attempts at growing Japan Law twins, and a natural Amethyst specimen from Guerrero that they had ‘rehealed’ and regrown the tip of a damaged crystal.

Lab grown Quartz display

Lab grown Quartz display

Quartz crystals grown by the hydrothermal method

Quartz crystals grown by the hydrothermal method

Attempts to grown Japan Law Quartz crystals

Attempts to grow Japan Law Quartz crystals

The Amethyst specimens that has been rehealed to grow the tip of the main crystal, with the before picture

The Amethyst specimen that had been rehealed to grow the damaged tip of the main crystal, with a ‘before’ picture

Onto the special exhibits with the theme of ‘Minerals of Western Europe’. This has been an excellent choice of theme bringing out a very wide selection of minerals including many exceptional specimens for the species and/or location. Many of these minerals are not the prettiest or flashiest for display but there were some outstanding pieces, with quality far exceeding what you commonly see for sale.

The mineral chosen for this year’s show poster was an Epidote from Knappenwald, Austria from the collection of the Natural History Museum of LA County, California and it was here on display.

Epidote from Knappenwand, Austria on display from the Natural History Museum of LA County

Epidote from Knappenwand, Austria on display from the Natural History Museum of LA County

Tucson Show poster 2015

Tucson Show poster 2015

Also from the LA County Museum was this Calcite twin ‘heart’:

A Calcite 'Heart' twin from Gillfoot Mine, Egremont, England, about 10cm across. Fro m the Natural History Museum of LA County

A Calcite ‘Heart’ twin from Gillfoot Mine, Egremont, England, about 10cm across. From the Natural History Museum of LA County

The Mineral Assocation of Dallas (MAD) are guaranteed to put on a display of superb specimens, and did not disappoint with their Minerals of Western Europe.

Display by Mineral Associate of Dallas

Display by Mineral Association of Dallas

Blue Fluorite from Puy-St-Gulmier, Herment, Puy-de-Dôme, Auvergne, France

A killer large blue Fluorite from Puy-St-Gulmier, France in the centre back of the display

Fluorite on Stilbite from Malmberget Mine, Lappland, Sweden

Fluorite on Stilbite from Malmberget Mine, Lappland, Sweden

Like two eyes watching you - Calcite on Hematite from Florence Mine, Egremont, England

Like two eyes watching you – Calcite on Hematite from Florence Mine, Egremont, England

Next to the MAD display was a wonderful display from the Krugerhaus, part of the Bergakademie Freiberg of Germany. The Krugerhaus houses the ‘Mineralogical Collection of Germany’, and the exhibition opened to the public in 2012. This exhibition together with the minerals from the collection at the Bergakademie and in the terra mineralia exhibition in Freudenstein Castle comprise one of the best and most extensive collections worldwide – a visit to Freiberg to see them is a must for every mineral collector.

How a Native Silver should look, not over-cleaned as some are. From Himmelsfurst Mine, Freiberg, Saxony, Germany

How a Native Silver should look, not over-cleaned as some are. From Himmelsfurst Mine, Freiberg, Saxony, Germany

A German classic - Galena pseudomorph after Pyromorphite from Kautenbach Mine, Germany

A German classic – Galena pseudomorph after Pyromorphite from Kautenbach Mine, Germany

Whilst it may not look spectacular to many, this is an exceptional Erythrite from Daniel Mine, Saxony, Germany

Whilst it may not look spectacular to many, this is an exceptional Erythrite from Daniel Mine, Saxony, Germany

The Natural History Museum, London were displaying the Frederick Noel Ashcroft Swiss Collection and classic Alpine minerals

The Natural History Museum, London were displaying the Frederick Noel Ashcroft Swiss Collection and classic Alpine minerals

A breath taking Jordanite crystal with lamellar twinning, from Lengenbach, Binn Valley, Switzerland. Centre bottom of the NHM London display

A breath taking Jordanite crystal with lamellar twinning, from Lengenbach, Binn Valley, Switzerland. Centre bottom of the NHM London display

Mineral classics of Germany display by the Mineral Museum of Bonn, Germany

Mineral Classics of Germany display by the Mineral Museum of Bonn, Germany

Display by the Mineralogical and Geological  Museum at Harvard University

Display by the Mineralogical and Geological Museum at Harvard University

A super deep blue Aquamarine from the Mourne Mountains, Northern Ireland

A super deep blue Aquamarine from the Mourne Mountains, Northern Ireland

Liroconite from Cornwall, England with large crystals to approx 1cm

Liroconite from Cornwall, England with large crystals to just over 1cm from the American Museum of Natural History

Display of European Minerals by the Denver Museum of Nature and Science

Display of European Minerals by the Denver Museum of Nature and Science

A large Native Silver from Kongsberg, Norway

A large Native Silver from Kongsberg, Norway forming the centrepiece

Western Europe minerals from the Royal Ontario Museum, with a lovely bright yellow Smithsonite on the back right

Western European minerals from the Royal Ontario Museum, with a lovely bright yellow Cadmium rich Smithsonite from Sardinia on the back right

Impressive rich Cronstedtite specimen from Baita, Romania

Closeup of the impressively rich Cronstedtite specimen from Baita, Romania

Gail and Jim Spann's impressive case of Western European Minerals

Gail and Jim Spann’s impressive case of Western European Minerals

A rather attractive Baryte with Sulphur from Machow Mine, Poland

A rather attractive Baryte with Sulphur from Machow Mine, Poland

A very large Apatite crystal from Panasqueira Mine, Portugal

A very large Apatite crystal from Panasqueira Mine, Portugal

Illustrated Early European Mineral Books on display by the Mineralogical Record

Illustrated Early European Mineral Books on display by the Mineralogical Record

The GIA (Gemological Institute of America) and the Geo-Literary Society had a display of Sowerby’s British Mineralogy. Sowerby’s illustrations document minerals of Great Britain, and were published as periodicals between 1802 to 1817. At the conclusion, the publishers offered a compiled complete works, typically as a 5 volume set. It is thought there are fewer than 100 of these complete 5 volume sets in existence today.

Sowerby's British Mineralogy 5 Volume Set

Sowerby’s British Mineralogy 5 Volume Set

Dona with Terri Ottaway from the GIA

Dona with Terri Ottaway from the GIA

Wayne and Dona had on display this Lingke Assay kit circa 1880

Wayne and Dona had on display this Lingke Assay kit circa 1880

There are also many competition displays at the show. Many were based on the show theme, including a competition for best of species.

Best of Species competition

Best of Species competition

German Pyromorphite, Matlockite from Derbyshire, England, and a sweet pink Fluorite from France

German Pyromorphite, Matlockite from Derbyshire, England, and a sweet pink Fluorite from France

And there were many other displays including this awesome faceted pearl, which unsurprisingly won first place in the single stone faceting competition 2014.

Faceted Pearl by Victor Tuzlukov

Faceted Pearl by Victor Tuzlukov

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More cut gemstones by Victor Tuzlukov

More cut gemstones by Victor Tuzlukov

One of the definite highlights of the show was the display of Amazonite Feldspar and Smoky Quartz specimens found by the guys at Pinnacle 5/ Glacier Mining. These crystals were found in the Icon Pocket of the Smoky Hawk Claim, Teller Co., Colorado in June 2012. It took almost a month to collect the pocket with approx 300,000 crystals and fragments, and over a two year period the crystals and fragments were washed, cleaned, laid out and painstakingly pieced back together, completed mostly by Tim Dorris. He succeeded in reconstructing this plate which is the largest plate ever found. The crystals of Amazonite are themselves huge measuring over 20cm in length, when they normally average around 5cm. This is the best find of Amazonite in 140 years of mining in Colorado. Other large groups are still being prepared.

Several reconstructed plates of Amazonite and Smoky Quartz from the Icon Pocket, Smoky Hawk Claim, Teller Co., Colorado.

Several reconstructed plates of Amazonite and Smoky Quartz from the Icon Pocket, Smoky Hawk Claim, Teller Co., Colorado.

The amazing large plate measuring 30.5 by 21.5 inches

The amazing ‘Smoky Hawk King’ large plate measuring 30.5 by 21.5 inches

The Pinnacle 5 team also had a display of some of their Topaz crystals and cut beautiful gemstones.

Cut and natural crystals of Topaz from the Topaz Mountain Gem Claim, Park Co., Colorado mined by Joe, Tim and Krystle Dorris

Cut and natural crystals of Topaz from the Topaz Mountain Gem Claim, Park Co., Colorado mined by Joe, Tim and Krystle Dorris

What a fabulous bi-colour Topaz

What a fabulous bi-colour Topaz cut by Ron Boyd

Gerhard Wagner had several displays of drool worthy Tourmalines. This is a small selection from his collection of more than 400 specimens which he has collected over 25 years.

Tourmalines by Gerhard Wagner in a range of colours

Tourmalines by Gerhard Wagner in a range of colours

Stunning Tourmaline on Quartz with Lepidolite from Pederneira Mine, Brazil

Stunning Tourmaline on Quartz with Lepidolite from Pederneira Mine, Brazil

Spectacular Calcites on Amethyst from Uruguay which have been removed from geodes.

Spectacular Calcites on Amethyst from Uruguay and Brazil which formed in geodes. The Calcite crystals at the front stand about 25cm high

Lloydy with Guenther Hoppe

Lloydy with Guenther Hoppe

Lois with good friend Marshall Sussman

Lois with Kristalle’s good friend Marshall Sussman

Tana and Steve Maslansky

Tana and Steve Maslansky

Robin with English collector Rick Turner

Robin with English collector Rick Turner

Dona with the lovely Lilly and Emma Pearson from New Mexico who bring Dona pistachio nuts each year.

Dona with the lovely Lilly and Emma Pearson from New Mexico who bring Dona pistachio nuts each year.

Busy at the show in the booth

Robin working hard on her show report

Robin working hard on her show report

Robbie McCarty, Lois Nelson, Audrey Lloyd

Robbie, Lois and Audrey have a well earned sit down at the end of the day

The theme for next year’s show is ‘Shades of Blue’ so we will leave you with this display case from the Mineral Enthusiasts of the Tucson Area to get you into the mood.

Shades of blue

Shades of blue

Our next post will be an overview of the show!

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